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Results

Around 1150 people responded to the Relationships Australia online survey in August 2017.  Just over three‑quarters of survey respondents (77%) identified as female, with more females than males responding in every age group (see figure 1 below).  Roughly 50 per cent of respondents comprised women aged between 30-49 years (inclusive).

As for previous surveys, the demographic profile of survey respondents remains consistent with our experience of the groups of people that would be accessing the Relationships Australia website.

The vast majority of both men and women (women –95%, men -90%) answered affirmatively to the question of whether they had ever considered donating their organs and tissues, and only 5 per cent of women and 8 per cent of men stated that this was not something that they had considered before (figure 2).

Survey respondents were asked how comfortable they are to talk about organ and tissue donation. About 70 per cent of both men and women responded that they were ‘very comfortable’; while 17 per cent of men and 21 per cent of women reported that they were ‘fairly comfortable’. More men (6%) than women (2%) reported that they were ‘fairly uncomfortable’ talking about organ and tissue donation (figure 3).

Both male and female survey respondents were most likely to report that they have discussed their wishes to donate their organs and tissues with their family. More women (35%) than men (21%) stated that they had not discussed their wishes with their family (figure 4).

Figure 5 shows that the significant proportion of both men (45%) and women (50%) were ‘very confident’ that their family would follow their organ and tissue donation wishes after they die. Fewer respondents (7 per cent of men and 5 per cent of women) reported that they were ‘not very confident’ that their wishes would be followed if they were thinking about organ and tissue donation.

Whilst a significant proportion of male and female respondents reported that they were ‘fairly confident’ that they know the wishes of their family members about organ and tissue donation (women -29%, men -31%), this was closely followed by respondents who reported that they were ‘not very confident’ about whether they know their family members’ organ donation decisions (women -26%, men -25%) (figure 6). Figure 7 shows that the majority of survey respondents would use websites, online resources or published brochures to get more information and support on organ and tissue donation. More women (70%) than men (56%) responded that they would get information from their family and friends, and about 8 per cent of both men and women reported that they would not seek out more information or support at all.

 

References

Oberender, F. (2011), Organ donation in Australia. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health.

www.donatelife.gov.au

Relationships Australia State and Territory websites