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Results

Approximately 1600 people responded to the Relationships Australia online survey in July 2018. Three quarters (73%) of respondents identified as female, with more female than male respondents in every age group (see Figure 1 below).  More than eighty-eight per cent of survey respondents were aged between 20-59 years, and more than fifty per cent of respondents comprised women aged between 30-49 years (inclusive).

As for previous surveys, the demographic profile of survey respondents remains consistent with our experience of the groups of people that would be accessing the Relationships Australia website.

A substantial majority of men and women reported that they are always or sometimes able to recognise when their own mental health is poor. Slightly more women (43%) than men (36%) reported that they could always recognise when their mental health is poor (Figure 2).

The majority of both men (87%) and women (93%) reported that they were always or sometimes able to recognise if others around them, such as family members or their partner, were suffering mental ill-health (Figure 3).

As shown in Figure 4, eighty-six per cent of women responded that they always or sometimes find mental health services useful. Fewer men (76%) responded that mental health services are always or sometimes useful. Ten per cent of male respondents reported that mental health support services are rarely useful.

As shown in Figure 5, two-thirds (66%) of women and fifty-five per cent of men reported that they would know where to go to access support for themselves or their partner’s mental health. One quarter of men (25%) reported that they do not know where to get mental health support, which was more than that reported by women (15%) (Figure 5).

More women (41%) than men (32%) reported that they can sometimes afford mental health support. Just under one third (32%) of women, and thirty per cent of men, responded that they can rarely or never afford mental health support if/when they need it (Figure 6).

Finally, respondents were asked whether they would prefer to use online mental health support platforms (such as the ‘headspace’ app), over other forms (such as seeing a counsellor or doctor in person) (Figure 7). Around one-third of both women (32%) and men (33%) reported that they do not prefer to use online mental health services over other, in-person forms of support. Just over half of female respondents (52%) and forty-five per cent of male respondents stated they would prefer to use more than one form of mental health support.

Relationships Australia State and Territory websites