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748 people responded to the Relationships Australia November-December 2019 survey. Seventy-one percent of respondents were women, twenty-six percent were men and three percent did not state their gender or chose ‘other’ (figure 1). As for previous surveys, the demographic profile of survey respondents is consistent with our experience of the groups of people that would be accessing the Relationships Australia website.
Figure 2 illustrates that fifty-nine percent of the respondents will be attending/or have attended a work-related Christmas party this year. A further thirty-five percent said they would not attend and six percent were not sure at the time they completed the survey.
We found that for the majority (39%) of respondents attending a work Christmas party this year, it would be their bosses shout (figure 3). A further seventeen percent would be paying for the party themselves, while the other twelve percent were sharing the costs with their employers.
Despite a widespread belief that a Christmas party is an excellent way to reward employees for their hard work throughout the year, forty percent of respondents felt a bonus was the best reward (figure 4). Twenty-two percent felt that a Christmas party paid for in full by their employer was the best reward. This was especially popular among respondents who are footing the bill for this year’s Christmas party (22%).
Another common conception is that work-place Christmas parties encourage mingling among staff who may not usually meet. Figure 5 illustrates that a fraction of a majority (42%) support this assumption and will try to socialise with as many colleagues as possible. Forty-one percent will mostly socialise with people they are already friends with or work closely with. Eleven percent will take the opportunity to expand their social horizons and try to meet colleagues that they have had little to do with previously. Finally, seven percent, while still planning on attending the party, do not enjoy socialising with their colleagues, friends or foes.
Work Christmas parties have the potential for encouraging poor behaviour which affects future attendance. While a majority (53%) of respondents had not witnessed any poor behaviour at a work-related Christmas, those who had (38%) appeared less likely to attend a Christmas party this year than those who had not (figure 6).
Given these statistics, many people (31%) still felt that a meal outside of work hours was appropriate. A similar number (30%) felt a meal during work hours was more suitable, while another twenty-four percent felt a team-building exercise or fun activity was a good alternative. A small proportion (5%) felt that work-related Christmas parties were inappropriate, of these respondents, forty-one percent had witnessed or been involved in damaging behaviour at previous parties.

748 people responded to the Relationships Australia November-December 2019 survey. Seventy-one percent of respondents were women, twenty-six percent were men and three percent did not state their gender or chose ‘other’ (figure 1).

As for previous surveys, the demographic profile of survey respondents is consistent with our experience of the groups of people that would be accessing the Relationships Australia website.

Figure 2 illustrates that fifty-nine percent of the respondents will be attending/or have attended a work-related Christmas party this year. A further thirty-five percent said they would not attend and six percent were not sure at the time they completed the survey.

We found that for the majority (39%) of respondents attending a work Christmas party this year, it would be their bosses shout (figure 3). A further seventeen percent would be paying for the party themselves, while the other twelve percent were sharing the costs with their employers.

Despite a widespread belief that a Christmas party is an excellent way to reward employees for their hard work throughout the year, forty percent of respondents felt a bonus was the best reward (figure 4). Twenty-two percent felt that a Christmas party paid for in full by their employer was the best reward. This was especially popular among respondents who are footing the bill for this year’s Christmas party (22%).

Another common conception is that work-place Christmas parties encourage mingling among staff who may not usually meet. Figure 5 illustrates that a fraction of a majority (42%) support this assumption and will try to socialise with as many colleagues as possible. Forty-one percent will mostly socialise with people they are already friends with or work closely with. Eleven percent will take the opportunity to expand their social horizons and try to meet colleagues that they have had little to do with previously. Finally, seven percent, while still planning on attending the party, do not enjoy socialising with their colleagues, friends or foes.

Work Christmas parties have the potential for encouraging poor behaviour which affects future attendance. While a majority (53%) of respondents had not witnessed any poor behaviour at a work-related Christmas, those who had (38%) appeared less likely to attend a Christmas party this year than those who had not (figure 6).

Given these statistics, many people (31%) still felt that a meal outside of work hours was appropriate. A similar number (30%) felt a meal during work hours was more suitable, while another twenty-four percent felt a team-building exercise or fun activity was a good alternative. A small proportion (5%) felt that work-related Christmas parties were inappropriate, of these respondents, forty-one percent had witnessed or been involved in damaging behaviour at previous parties.

Relationships Australia State and Territory websites